Patchwork, An American Tradition

by Andrew Payne October 19, 2014

Patchwork, An American Tradition

Patchworking began as a way to utilize scraps of fabric left over from past projects. After cutting fabrics for dresses, shirts, blouses, pants, jackets, whatever was being made, there were plenty of odd shaped pieces to repurpose and give a second lease on life. Quilts, of course, were the first creations resulting from patchworking. A perfect example of "waste not, want not". 

 As collectors of vast amounts of unique and sometimes rare fabric, we wanted to showcase their beauty and individuality by combining the various textures and weaves into one item.  While the technique is not a new one, we believe that bringing several pieces together in a patchwork create a harmonious collective that is a refreshing way to look at accessories, namely the necktie.

 This very hand made product is a combination of many artisans, and in the age of automated "everything", the slow and tedious process feels like very cathartic art. Tailors, quilters and cutters, all these craftsmen working on their piece of the process, have created a product where each piece is labored over and completely unique; no two are alike.  We hope you enjoy these ties as much as we enjoy bringing them to you.  This is truly a case of "it takes a village" to make these wonderful pieces.

Please stop over and check out our newest Patchwork designs in our shop
 
Patchwork, An American Tradition from General Knot on Vimeo.
Each design is completely unique. Choose yours today...




Andrew Payne
Andrew Payne

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